Difference between revisions of "Template:Pinoy Flashback"

From Wikipilipinas: The Hip 'n Free Philippine Encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
 
<div style="margin:5px; margin-left:0.1em; margin-bottom: -1em; font-size:9pt; padding:5px; text-align: left;">
 
<div style="margin:5px; margin-left:0.1em; margin-bottom: -1em; font-size:9pt; padding:5px; text-align: left;">
  
*'''September 20, 1899''' – President [[Emilio Aguinaldo]] issued a decree instructing competent teachers and principals to teach subjects to students of secondary schools.
+
*'''September 21, 1891''' – The Sultan and Datus of Buluong, [[Cotabato]] informed the Spanish of their willingness to acknowledge the Spanish rule.
*'''September 20, 1934''' – Filipino delegates to the National Assembly were elected. Half were elected by provincial and municipal officials from the list provided by Kapisanan ng Paglilingkod sa Bagong Pilipinas (KALIBAPI), while the other half was composed of provincials and city mayors deemed by the Constitution of the Second Philippine Republic as the assembly's ex-oficio members.
+
*'''September 21, 1896''' – [[Tomas Remigio]], one of the finest playwrights during the American Colonial period, was arrested for revolutionary activities. He was the secretary of "Mayon", which was a branch of [[La Liga Filipina]]. While in prison, he was tortured for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of the revolutionary funds. He was exiled for twenty years in Barcelona and Cartagena, Spain. He was given an early release by the Spaniards and returned toManila in 1899. 
 +
*'''September 21, 1900''' – Filipino freedom-fighter Faustin Pantua wrote about American brutality that resulted from the latter's defeat at the [[Battle of Mabitac]], where there were 180 American casualties compared to only five Filipino casualties. According to Pantua, when the Americans learned the death of Lt. Col. Fidel Angeles in the Mabitac Battle, they clothed a person they have held captive for years to make him look like a Filipino colonel and killed him in the town of Baybay to make it appear that the Mabitac defenders fell into their hands.
 +
*'''September 21, 1949''' – Head of the Philippine delegation to the United Nations (UN) Ambassador [[Carlos P. Romulo]] was elected President of the fourth General Assembly.
  
  
 
<div style="float: right; text-align: 85%; margin-top: -2em;"><small>'''To learn more about Philippine history and literature, visit [http://filipiniana.net/ Filipiniana.net]'''</small></div>
 
<div style="float: right; text-align: 85%; margin-top: -2em;"><small>'''To learn more about Philippine history and literature, visit [http://filipiniana.net/ Filipiniana.net]'''</small></div>

Revision as of 00:46, 21 September 2017

  • September 21, 1891 – The Sultan and Datus of Buluong, Cotabato informed the Spanish of their willingness to acknowledge the Spanish rule.
  • September 21, 1896Tomas Remigio, one of the finest playwrights during the American Colonial period, was arrested for revolutionary activities. He was the secretary of "Mayon", which was a branch of La Liga Filipina. While in prison, he was tortured for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of the revolutionary funds. He was exiled for twenty years in Barcelona and Cartagena, Spain. He was given an early release by the Spaniards and returned toManila in 1899.
  • September 21, 1900 – Filipino freedom-fighter Faustin Pantua wrote about American brutality that resulted from the latter's defeat at the Battle of Mabitac, where there were 180 American casualties compared to only five Filipino casualties. According to Pantua, when the Americans learned the death of Lt. Col. Fidel Angeles in the Mabitac Battle, they clothed a person they have held captive for years to make him look like a Filipino colonel and killed him in the town of Baybay to make it appear that the Mabitac defenders fell into their hands.
  • September 21, 1949 – Head of the Philippine delegation to the United Nations (UN) Ambassador Carlos P. Romulo was elected President of the fourth General Assembly.


To learn more about Philippine history and literature, visit Filipiniana.net